3D Printed standard gauge Locomotives

standard gauge locos .

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All 3D printed designs by Simon Dawson (Rue d'Étropal) , currently produced to order by Shapeways. Just follow links to Shapeways pages.

 

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Pictures are just for reference, not of specific scaled model.  

           
Ford Dagenham diesel electric shunter Hawthorn-Leslie 0-6-0F Fireless loco Standard Gauge Simplex shunting loco Standard Gauge 50hp 8ton Simplex shunting loco    
North Sunderland Railway Manning Wardle Bamburgh North Sunderland Railway Armstrong Whitworth diesel Cockerill type IV vertical boiler steam loco Gaston Moyse 8T loco Baldwin 50hp gas mechanical loco (SG conversion)  
Crochat type 22 loco Crochat type 44 loco        
 USATC S160 2-8-0          
Longmoor Military Railway 0-6-2T Sir John French KESR 0-8-0T Hecate Shropshire and Montgomery Railway Loco Gazelle  Shropshire &Montgomery Railway No 2 Severn LSWR/KESR Saddleback loco  
Corringham Light Rilway Kerr Stuart loco Kynite Kitson 0-4-0wt loco Manning Wardle L class loco- Sir Berkeley      
Garstang and Knott End Railway 0-4-2ST Loco HEBE  Garstang and Knott End Railway 0-6-0ST Loco HOPE  Garstang and Knott End Railway 0-6-0ST Loco FARMERS FRIEND Garstang and Knott End Railway 0-4-0ST Loco UNION Garstang and Knott End Railway 0-6-0ST Loco JUBILEE QUEEN Garstang and Knott End Railway 0-6-0ST Loco NEW CENTURY
Garstang and Knott End Railway 0-6-0T KNOTT END Garstang and Knott End Railway 2-6-0T BLACKPOOL        
Selsey Tramway 0-4-2ST Chichester no 1 Selsey Tramway Peckett 2-4-2T  Selsey Tramway Manning Wardle Sidlesham 0-6-0ST  Selsey Tramway Manning Wardle Morous 0-6-0ST Selsey Tramway Manning Wardle Ringing Rock  0-6-0ST Selsey Tramway Hudswell Clarke Chichester (2)  0-6-0ST
Selsey Tramway 0-4-2ST Hesperus          
LMS Fowler 2-6-4T LMS Fowler 2-6-2T Midland Railway Battery Loco North Staffordshire Railway Battery Loco    
           
SR Class W 2-6-4 loco Bulleid Q1 loco Bulleid WC/BOB loco Bulleid proposed 2-8-2 loco    
SECR H class 0-4-4T loco LSWR 0415 Radial Tank Loco LSWR O2 Loco PDSWJR 0-6-2T loco LSWR Beattie Well Tank Loco  
J94 austerity 060T LNER A4 loco LNER W1 loco LNER P1 2-8-2 loco LNER P2 2-8-2 loco GCR A5 4-6-2T loco
GER/LNER Y6 loco GER/LNER J70 tram loco        
GCR J10 loco and tender GCR J11 loco and tender GCR O4 loco and tender GCR C13 4-4-2T loco GER/LNER J69  loco  
NER EE1 electric loco NER ES1 BO-BO electric loco NER EF1/EB1 BO-BO electric loco NER O(LNER G5) class 0-4-4T loco NER P3(LNER J27) class 0-6-0 loco NER T2(LNER Q6) class 0-8-0 loco
LNER/NBR J83 D class  LNER/NBR N15 A class  LNER/NBR C15 M class  LNER/NBR J37 S class     
GWR Collett Goods loco(2251)          
BRGWR)Gas Turbine loco 18000 BR (GWR) Gas Turbine loco 181000 BR class 80 prototype AC electric loco GT3 Gas Turbine loco BR class 23(Baby Deltic) loco  BR class 41(Warship) loco 
BR class 37 loco           
Metropolitan Railway Camelback electric loco Metropolitan Railway BTH Boxcab electric loco Metropolitan Railway Metro-Vick electric loco Metropolitan Railway class K 2-6-4T loco Metropolitan Railway class H 4-4-4T loco Met/LNER H2 4-4-4T loco
Metropolitan Railway class G 0-6-4T loco Met/LNER class M2 0-6-4T loco Metropolitan Railway class F 0-6-2T loco Metropolitan Railway class E 0-4-4T loco Metropolitan Railway class D 2-4-0T loco Metropolitan Railway class C 0-4-4T loco
Metropolitan Railway class A 4-4-0T loco Metropolitan Railway Peckett 0-6-0ST loco Metropolitan Railway Hunslet 0-6-0T loco District Railway Electric Loco    
Description Model Scales
     
Standard Gauge    
Steam Locomotives    
 

LNER J94 austerity loco

Designed by Riddles during WW2, based on standard Hunslet design, for MOD use. After the war many found their way into industrial use, and some found work outside the UK, including 2 in France which worked on the Peugeot factory railway. 


Requires chassis,wheels etc

Y6 loco Body

The original smaller 040 tram loco built for dockyards but mostly associated with the Wisbech and Upwell tramway, and very similar to its bigger J70 060 version. Best known as Toby in railway stories.

 

y6-tram-loco-boiler

basic boiler interior for Y6 tram loco . Room to add some weight in boiler

 

 

GER/LNER J70 tram loco

The bigger brother for the original smaller 040 tram loco built for dockyards but mostly associated with the Wisbech and Upwell tramway. Best known as Toby in railway stories. 
 
Hawthorn-Leslie 0-6-0F Fireless loco

An 0-6-0 version of standard Hawthorn Leslie 0-4-o fireless loco. This one was initially built for use at Slacks Valley Generating Station Chadderton,in 1929, and in 1958 transferred to CEGB Huncoat where it operated as number 3. 
This is body only.Chassis required along with fittings. 

 
 

 

 

Shropshire and Montgomery Railway Loco Gazelle

Gazelle was built in 1893 by A. Dodman & Co Ltd, Highgate Works, Kings Lynn,as a 2-2-2 well tank to the order of a Mr William Burkett for his private use.
Colonel Stephens bought her in 1911, for use as an engineer's inspection train on the Shropshire and Montgomery Railway and then rebuilt her as an 0-4-2 well tank,with a cab and tender enclosure fitted, by WG Bagnall Ltd. 
Gazelle continued to run up to the WW2, and was was used by the War Department when they took over the line, up till 1945.Nothing happened until the line was closed, when she was moved to Longmoor Military Railway, and put on display. She is now on display at the Kent and East Sussex Railway.

Requires wheels,chassis etc

 
 

 

SR Class W 2-6-4 loco

The SR Class W were 3-cylinder 2-6-4T tank engines designed in 1929 by Richard Maunsell for use on the Southern Railway . They were introduced in 1932 and constructed at Eastleigh and Ashford. The class was intended for short distance, inter-company/regional freight traffic transfer in London, and were standardised with parts from the N, N1, U and U1 classes.

requires detailing, chassis etc

 
 Shropshire &Montgomery Railway No 2 Severn (early)

Shropshire and Montgomery Railway No 2 , Severn, (originally named Hecate). 0-4-2 tank loco. 
Cab altered during time on the railway. Both versions available. 

This is early cab version

Require chassis and finishing off

   
Shropshire &Montgomery Railway No 2 Severn (late)

Shropshire and Montgomery Railway No 2 , Severn, (originally named Hecate). 0-4-2 tank loco. 
Cab altered during time on the railway. Both versions available. 

This is later cab version

Require chassis and finishing off

 

   
 

LMS Fowler 2-6-4T

125 examples of the class were built. The last 30 numbered 2395 to 2424 were fitted with side-window cabs. The LMS classified them 4P, BR 4MT. They were the basis for a family of subsequent LMS/BR Class 4 2-6-4T locomotives.

Originally built with a large side opening to cab, which was found to cause problems when running in reverse. Cabs were modified from mid 30s, but final batch of locos(often referred to as limosines) was built with side windows which solved the problem.
After WW2 external steam pipes and new cylinders s were fitted to improve steaming, and both cab versions were modified in this way.

Body only, requires chassis and finishing

 

Original version     

 

Original with modified cab     

 

Limousine cab version     

 

Modified cab version with external steam pipes    

 

Limousine cab version with external steam pipes  

LMS Fowler 2-6-2T

70 examples of the class were built. They were intended as a smaller version of the successful 2-6-4t already in use, but they were underpowered and not popular. Some were fitted with condensing apparatus for use in London tunnels, and others were fitted for pushpull duties.

After WW2 external steam pipes were fitted to improve steaming, and new Stanier type chimney, but this did not improve things, as main problem was the underpowered boiler.

Body only, requires chassis and finishing

original version  
modified version  

 

 

Bulleid Q1 loco

loco body



The SR Q1 class is a type of austerity steam locomotive constructed during the Second World War. It was designed by Oliver Bulleid for use on the intensive freight turns experienced during wartime on the Southern Railway.

Could also be used for an 0-8-0 variation(fictional but plausible)

Requires chassis and finishing

Require chassis and finishing off

More fictional but plausible  versions HERE

Bulleid Q1 loco

loco tender body

l

The SR Q1 class is a type of austerity steam locomotive constructed during the Second World War. It was designed by Oliver Bulleid for use on the intensive freight turns experienced during wartime on the Southern Railway.

Could also be used for other Q1 variation(fictional but plausible)

Requires chassis and finishing

Require chassis and finishing off

More fictional but plausible  versions HERE

 

 

 

 
  Bulleid West Country /Battle of Britain 4-6-2 loco

loco, original cab

Bulleid designed this as a light weight version of his Merchant Navy class loco, and it was both powerful enough and lightweight enough for rural lines with lower weight limits. 
First locos entered service in 1945. Initially took names of West Country towns, then new batch took names inspired by the war time efforts of the RAF.
Original design had a major problem with forward visibility so the cab fronts were modified with a V shaped front window. Problems with tenders resulted in various modifications .
To enable running on Hastings line(which in the end they did not run on) cab width was 8ft 6in. Final locos built had cab width increased to 9ft.
In 1950s plans were put forward to rebuild all locos , after similar rebuilding of the Merchant Navy class, but with long term plans for replacement of steam with diesel and electric, these plans were only carried out on some locos.
Many of the locos continued in service up till 1967, and several modified and un modified locos have been preserved. 


Chassis and wheels required. 

    

 

 

Bulleid West Country /Battle of Britain 4-6-2 loco

loco, modified cab

Bulleid designed this as a light weight version of his Merchant Navy class loco, and it was both powerful enough and lightweight enough for rural lines with lower weight limits. 
First locos entered service in 1945. Initially took names of West Country towns, then new batch took names inspired by the war time efforts of the RAF.
Original design had a major problem with forward visibility so the cab fronts were modified with a V shaped front window. Problems with tenders resulted in various modifications .
To enable running on Hastings line(which in the end they did not run on) cab width was 8ft 6in. Final locos built had cab width increased to 9ft.
In 1950s plans were put forward to rebuild all locos , after similar rebuilding of the Merchant Navy class, but with long term plans for replacement of steam with diesel and electric, these plans were only carried out on some locos.
Many of the locos continued in service up till 1967, and several modified and un modified locos have been preserved. 


Chassis and wheels required. 

    

 

 

Bulleid West Country /Battle of Britain 4-6-2 loco

tender, original

Bulleid designed this as a light weight version of his Merchant Navy class loco, and it was both powerful enough and lightweight enough for rural lines with lower weight limits. 
First locos entered service in 1945. Initially took names of West Country towns, then new batch took names inspired by the war time efforts of the RAF.
Original design had a major problem with forward visibility so the cab fronts were modified with a V shaped front window. Problems with tenders resulted in various modifications .
To enable running on Hastings line(which in the end they did not run on) cab width was 8ft 6in. Final locos built had cab width increased to 9ft.
In 1950s plans were put forward to rebuild all locos , after similar rebuilding of the Merchant Navy class, but with long term plans for replacement of steam with diesel and electric, these plans were only carried out on some locos.
Many of the locos continued in service up till 1967, and several modified and un modified locos have been preserved. 


Chassis and wheels required. 

    

 

 

Bulleid West Country /Battle of Britain 4-6-2 loco

tender, modified


Bulleid designed this as a light weight version of his Merchant Navy class loco, and it was both powerful enough and lightweight enough for rural lines with lower weight limits. 
First locos entered service in 1945. Initially took names of West Country towns, then new batch took names inspired by the war time efforts of the RAF.
Original design had a major problem with forward visibility so the cab fronts were modified with a V shaped front window. Problems with tenders resulted in various modifications .
To enable running on Hastings line(which in the end they did not run on) cab width was 8ft 6in. Final locos built had cab width increased to 9ft.
In 1950s plans were put forward to rebuild all locos , after similar rebuilding of the Merchant Navy class, but with long term plans for replacement of steam with diesel and electric, these plans were only carried out on some locos.
Many of the locos continued in service up till 1967, and several modified and un modified locos have been preserved. 


Chassis and wheels required. 

    

 

 

  Bulleid proposed 2-8-2 loco

Bulleid proposed a 2-8-2 loco based on the P2 designed for the LNER when he worked there. Unfortunately the SR Civil Engineer was not keen, so the Merchant Navy class was built. 
A simple weight diagram and a published painting show the proposed loco, and this design has been based on those, combined with some detail from the Merchant Navy loco.



Chassis and wheels required. 

It might be possible to adapt a P2 chassis , or use parts from Merchant Navy loco. 
 

 

North Sunderland Railway Manning Wardle Bamburgh

Built for the North Sunderland Railway in 1898, described as a modified class L design. Finally scrapped in 1949, having worked on the line, on and off since the line opened.

Requires chassis,wheels etc
 

Cockerill type IV vertical boiler steam loco

Built by Cockerill in Belgium. The type 4 was built from 1883 to 1949, and was a very successful shunting loco. Some were fitted to pull coaches. 
Several preserved.


Requires wheels,chassis 
 
   

 

 

GCR C13 4-4-2T loco


The GCR introduced steam railmotors in 1904. By 1922, their unpopularity led to them being withdrawn, and the coach parts were converted into trailers. By1931 they were paired with ex LDECR 6 wheel coaches and in 1933 these were replaced with ex London suburban coaches, converted from all 1st class to composites with a brake compartment replacing one end compartment. 
Ex GCR C13 4-4-2T locos were adapted for pushpull and used with these coaches in South Manchester area up till end of 1950s. 
C13 pushpull locos were also used on the Chalfont to Chesham branchline with ex Metropolitan stock until line was electrified at end of 1950s. 


Requires bogies,wheels etc and finishing.

GCR coaches here

 
  CR/LNER A5(9N) Loco


Late GCR/LNER modified version with side cab windows

The Great Central Railway Class 9N, classified A5 by the LNER, was a class of 4-6-2 tank locomotives designed by John G. Robinson for suburban passenger services.

The GCR built 21 locomotives at Gorton Works in three batches between 1911 and 1917. They ordered a fourth batch of ten from Gorton, but this was not built until after the 1923 Grouping. The LNER then ordered a fifth batch of 13 to a modified design, incorporating reduced boiler mountings and detail differences, and these were built by the outside contractors Hawthorn, Leslie & Co. during 1925–26.

Requires bogies,wheels etc and finishing.

GCR J10 loco

late condition.

Small cutouts in cab sides.

Originally designed by Parker and Pollitt for the MS&LR. More built und Robinson for GCR. Built for goods work, but in later years also used on passenger services.

Used all over GCR system,and in BR days some transferred to LMS depots near Manchester and prove to be popular. Last examples withdrawn in 1961.

Unfortunately none preserved.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

GCR J10 loco

late condition.

Large cutouts in cab sides.

Originally designed by Parker and Pollitt for the MS&LR. More built und Robinson for GCR. Built for goods work, but in later years also used on passenger services.

Used all over GCR system,and in BR days some transferred to LMS depots near Manchester and prove to be popular. Last examples withdrawn in 1961.

Unfortunately none preserved.

 

GCR J10 loco

Small tender.

Originally designed by Parker and Pollitt for the MS&LR. More built und Robinson for GCR. Built for goods work, but in later years also used on passenger services.

Used all over GCR system,and in BR days some transferred to LMS depots near Manchester and prove to be popular. Last examples withdrawn in 1961.

Unfortunately none preserved.

 

GCR J10 loco

Large tender.

Originally designed by Parker and Pollitt for the MS&LR. More built und Robinson for GCR. Built for goods work, but in later years also used on passenger services.

Used all over GCR system,and in BR days some transferred to LMS depots near Manchester and prove to be popular. Last examples withdrawn in 1961.

Unfortunately none preserved.

 

 
GCR/LNER J11 Loco

early condition

First goods loco designed by Robinson for GCR, but proved to be just as useful on passenger duties. Survived into BR days, after various modifications. 
Unfortunately none preserved. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

GCR/LNER J11 Loco

LNER composite gauge version

First goods loco designed by Robinson for GCR, but proved to be just as useful on passenger duties. Survived into BR days, after various modifications. 
Unfortunately none preserved. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

GCR/LNER J11 Loco

Thompson rebuild

First goods loco designed by Robinson for GCR, but proved to be just as useful on passenger duties. Survived into BR days, after various modifications. 

In 1940s Thompson chose to modify some by fitting long-travel piston valves similar to those used on the J39s.This resulted in boiler being raised and other modifications as a result.

Unfortunately none preserved. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

GCR/LNER J11 Loco tender


standard 4000 gal version

Requires wheels etc and finishing.
GCR/LNER J11 Loco tender


smaller 3250 gal version

Requires wheels etc and finishing.
GCR/LNER O4/3 loco

Originally built for the GCR , and adopted as a design for the ROD during WW1. After the war the LNER bought some back and these were classified as O4/3 type. 
Continued in service till 1960s. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
GCR/LNER O4/8 loco

Originally built for the GCR and ROD during WW1.
When Thompson took over after Gresley died, he started a major rebuild, and some O4 locos, both original and ROD were rebuilt with B1 type boilers and cabs.
Continued in service till 1960s. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
4000 tender for GCR/LNER O4 loco

no water scoop fitted on this version

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

4000 tender for GCR/LNER O4 loco

water scoop originally fitted on this version. Cover remained after water scoop removed.

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

USATC S160 2-8-0 loco


The United States Army Transportation Corps S160 Class was a class of 2-8-0 steam locomotive, designed for heavy freight work in Europe during World War II. A total of 2,120 were built and they worked on railways across much of the world, including Africa, Asia, all of Europe and South America.

A large number are preserved including examples in the UK. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
LSWR O2 loco
(Isle of Wight version)


The LSWR O2 Class was a class of 0-4-4T steam locomotive designed for the London and South Western Railway by William Adams. Sixty were constructed during the late nineteenth century. 

After electrification of many of the Southern Railway lines used by the O2s , they became redundant. Some were scrapped, but two O2s were shipped across the Solent in 1923 and trialled extensively on services across the island, resulting in 23 ultimately being transferred to the island. Although the lack of adequate coal bunker space initially hampered the class, once bunkers were extended they were very successful, and ran services up till electrification of the last surviving island railway.


Requires chassis,wheels etc
LSWR O2 loco

(mainland version)

Requires chassis,wheels etc

PDSWJR 0-6-2T loco

For the PDSWJR Callington Branch so Colonal Stephens ordered these 0-6-2Ts in 1907. Earl of Mount Edgcumbe and Lord St Leven were largely made up of the same standard components as Hecate on KESR, indeed in many respects they were identical but with the addition of a Belpaire firebox. 
They were very successful and continued in service on the line till mid 50s when Ivatt tank locos replaced them.
A similar loco was later supplied to Woolmar/Longmoor Military Railway, with some changes such as extended coal box. 

Requires wheels,chassis etc
Longmoor Military Railway 0-6-2T Loco Sir John French

Based on the original locos supplied to PDSWJR ,for Callington Branch, and entered service in 1911 . It had a few changes, such as outside valve gear, larger water tanks and extended coal bunker. 
A very successful loco, continued in service up till end of WW2 and then scrapped.

Requires wheels,chassis etc
KESR 0-8-0T Loco Hecate

Originally ordered for the KESR, arriving in 1905. It was not really suitable, being too heavy and rigid for the lightweight track, and was swapped with the Southern Railway in 1931 for some items of tock and another loco . The SR found it useful, and replaced the boiler in 1939, and it then soldiered on at Nine Elms until 1950 when it was involved in a crash and scrapped.
The PDSWJR 0-6-2T locos were based on this design, and were very successful. 

Requires wheels,chassis etc
Corringham Light Railway

Kerr Stuart Waterloo class loco 0-4-2 Knynite



The Corringham Light Railway was built to connect the village of Corringham to the newly built ammunitions factory at Tames Haven in Essex. Primarily for workers at factory. 
The line opened in 1901 and closed in the 1950s

This was the second loco bought by the railway, in 1903.It was a standard Kerr Stuart design known as the Waterloo class after it being initially supplied to the Waterloo Sugar Estates Ltd in Trinidad. The design could be supplied in various track gauges, and a 3ft gauge version was also supplied to the RedlakeTramway in Devon. 
The loco was named Kynite and was used up till 1923, then stored till 1930 and scrapped, eventually being broken up in 1953. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  Kitson 0-4-0WT loco Cordite

The Corringham Light Railway was built to connect the village of Corringham to the newly built ammunitions factory at Tames Haven in Essex. Primarily for workers at factory. 
The line opened in 1901 and closed in the 1950s

The first loco was a Kitson o-4-oWT , one of 3 originally built for the West Lancashire Railway and returned to builds as they were not suitable.One of the other 2 was bought by the Liverpool Overhead Railway, but the fate of the other loco is unknown. 

The loco was weak, and could only pull one coach o the Corringham Light Railway. It was withdrawn in 1930. The LOR loco lasted longer, primarily because a new boiler was fitted, altering its appearance and other alterations were made including extending rear buffer beam and moving backwards. It then lasted into 1940s/50s being replaced by a Ruston 48D. 


Model based on known dimensions and photos. Alterations were made to locos over the years.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  Metropolitan Railway Class K 2-6-4T loco

built by Armstrong Whitworth in 1925, using parts manufactured at the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, to the design of the SECR N Class 2-6-0 locomotives .


Sold to LNER in 1939, and as non standard locos withdrawn when major repairs required and scrapped between 1943 and 1948.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  Metropolitan Railway H class 4-4-4T loco



Introduced between October 1920 and June 1921. The H Class were considered to be good engines well-suited to the express trains they worked, allowing for a reduction in running times of up to six minutes. They were designed with a hauling capacity of 250 long tons .

When the steam-hauled services were transferred from London Transport to the London and North Eastern Railway in 1937, all eight H Class locomotives were included to continue working the same trains. The LNER numbered them 6415–6422 and classified them as H2 Class. In the 1940s, they were moved from Neasden (LNER) shed to the Nottingham area and worked over other parts of the former Great Central Railway system.

All were withdrawn and scrapped between 1942 and 1947.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  Metropolitan Railway/LNER H2 class 4-4-4T loco



Introduced between October 1920 and June 1921. The H Class were considered to be good engines well-suited to the express trains they worked, allowing for a reduction in running times of up to six minutes. They were designed with a hauling capacity of 250 long tons .

When the steam-hauled services were transferred from London Transport to the London and North Eastern Railway in 1937, all eight H Class locomotives were included to continue working the same trains. The LNER numbered them 6415–6422 and classified them as H2 Class. In the 1940s, they were moved from Neasden (LNER) shed to the Nottingham area and worked over other parts of the former Great Central Railway system.

All were withdrawn and scrapped between 1942 and 1947.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  Metropolitan Railway G class 0-6-4T loco

The Metropolitan Railway G Class consisted of four 0-6-4T steam locomotives, numbered 94 to 97.They were built by Yorkshire Engine Company in 1915. 
In 1937 when all four were transferred to the LNER. The LNER numbered them 6154–6157 and classified them as M2 Class.
All were withdrawn and scrapped between 1943 and 1948. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  Metropolitan Railway/LNER M2 class 0-6-4T loco


The Metropolitan Railway G Class consisted of four 0-6-4T steam locomotives, numbered 94 to 97.They were built by Yorkshire Engine Company in 1915. 
In 1937 when all four were transferred to the LNER. The LNER numbered them 6154–6157 and classified them as M2 Class.
All were withdrawn and scrapped between 1943 and 1948. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
   Metropolitan Railway F class 0-6-2T loco

The F class was based on the earlier E Class. Four locomotives, numbered 90 to 93 were built by Yorkshire Engine Company in 1901.

They were intended to work freight trains over the Metropolitan Railway mainline.
All remained with London Transport and were scrapped between 1957 and 1962.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  Metropolitan Railway E class 0-4-4T loco

The Metropolitan Railway E Class was a class of 0-4-4T steam locomotives totalling seven locomotives ,built between 1896 and 1901.
They were displaced from the main passenger trains by the 4-4-4T H Class in 1920, moving to lesser jobs such as trains on the Chesham branch, goods trains and engineering duties.
Four locos were taken into London Transport stock, and one survived into 1960s and is now preserved. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
Metropolitan Railway D class 2-4-0T loco

six 2-4-0T tank engines were built in 1894-1895 by Sharp, Stewart and Company. 
Withdrawn from 1920. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
Metropolitan Railway C class 0-4-4T loco


Four locomotives built in 1891 by Neilson and Company. They were to a design by James Stirling, originally the Q class of the South Eastern Railway.

Withdrawn from 1920. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
Metropolitan Railway A class 4-4-0T loco



built by Beyer Peacock, first used in 1864. A total of 40 A Class and 26 of the slightly different B Class were delivered by 1885. 
Originally used in underground lines, but after electrification , many transferred to mainline, sold or scrapped. Cabs added after transfer to openair duties and in this form one was used on Brill branch until that line closed and continued as a yard shunter up till 1948 and is now preserved in early cabless condition. 


Requires finishing off, wheels etc
Metropolitan Railway A class 4-4-0T loco

version with condensing pipes removed

   Metropolitan Railway Peckett 0-6-0ST loco 

In 1897 and 1899, the Met received two 0-6-0 saddle tank locomotives to a standard Peckett design(type X). Unclassified by the Met, these were generally used for shunting at Neasden and Harrow.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
Metropolitan Railway Hunslet 0-6-0T loco

in 1931 two locos were bought from Hunslet to replace 2 of the A class locos on shunting duties. They were taken into LT stock(numbers L30 and L31) and continued in service until 1963. 


Requires finishing off, wheels etc
 

NER Class O (LNER Class G5) 




designed by Wilson Worsdell. 

A total of 110 were built between 1894 and 1901, across seven batches.


The G5 design served its purpose well, and no substantial changes had been made by Grouping in 1923. A modified boiler design used by the LNER after 1930 for replacements. This design was further modified from 1937 and had a dome 20in further back than on the earlier boilers. 

The G5s survived pretty much intact to 1949. The first withdrawal was in 1950, but most were withdrawn between 1955 and 1958 as they were replaced by diesel railcars and DMUs (diesel multiple units). The last G5 was withdrawn in 1958. 

  NER Class O (LNER Class G5) 


original bunker version(NER)






Requires finishing off, wheels etc
NER Class O (LNER Class G5) 




Modified bunker(NER/LNER)





Requires finishing off, wheels etc


Replacement boiler(LNER/BR)



Requires finishing off, wheels etc


Hopper bunker(LNER/BR)

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  

NER P3 Class(LNER J27)

The P3 Class(LNER J27) was designed by Wilson Worsdell and was a relatively minor modification of the existing North Eastern Railway NER Class P2 (LNER Class J26). 
Initially eighty J27s were built between 1906 and 1909 in five batches, distributed amongst the NER's Darlington Works, North British Locomotive Company, Beyer, Peacock and Company, and Robert Stephenson and Company. 
Five more were delivered in 1921-2 with Schmidt superheaters and piston valves, followed by a final order of ten built by the LNER at Darlington Works in 1923. The superheated J27s could be identified by their extended smokeboxes. 

The Diagram 57 boiler was modified in 1939 to produce the Diagram 57A boiler. 
Various modifications were done over the years.

The last J27 was withdrawn in September 1967.One is preserved .




  loco Late/final (low dome, low chimney, saturated) version

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

loco Late/final (low dome, low chimney, superheated) version

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

loco Late/final (modified NER dome, saturated) version

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

loco type 57 boiler, saturated version

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

loco type 57 boiler, superheated version

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

Tender for J27 (final condition)

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

Type 2 (post 1915 built) tender for J27 (final condition)

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

  NER T2 Class(LNER Q6)

Fitted with Diagram 50A boiler

A very successful design by Raven for the NER,based on earlier T1 loco. 
Primarily used on heavy coal trains, initially in the north east, not being fited for passenger use. 

The last Q6 was withdrawn in 1967.One is preserved .

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

NER T2 Class(LNER Q6) Tender

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

LNER P1 2-8-2 loco

2 of these powerful locos(2393 and 2394) were designed by Gresley for pulling long freight trains. They were also fitted with experimental boosters on trailing wheels. 
Traffic was never really high enough, and paths for longer trains were also difficult to fit i, so their potential was never fully realised. 
In 1930s some rebuilding done, with cab alterations being most obvious.
A1 and A3 boilers were fitted in final years. 
loco 2394 had a banjo style dome on its A3 boiler.
The end came in 1945 when Thompson decided to withdraw them, the then relatively new boilers and the original tenders found other use. The tenders ended up with the new B2 locos. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
LNER P1 2-8-2 loco

(original condition)

LNER P1 2-8-2 loco

(modified condition)

LNER P1 2-8-2 loco

(2394 final condtion)

LNER P1 2-8-2 loco

Tender

  

LNER A4 loco and tender

 

 

 

 
Single Chimney , with valences in place

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 
Single Chimney , with valences removed

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

   
Double Chimney , with valences in place

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

   
Double Chimney , with valences removed

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

   
Corridor tender, modified A3 tender

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

   


Early fully streamlined


Fully streamline version as fitted to some A4 locos.
Chassis and wheels required. 
Non corridor tender

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

   

LNER P2 2-8-2 Loco

2001 Cock O' The North
2002 Earl Marischal
2003 Lord President
2004 Mons Meg
2005 Thane of Fife
2006 Wolf of Badenoch

Class was first express passenger 2-8-2 loco in Britain. Designed for use on heavily graded Edinburgh to Aberdeen line. 
First 2 had squarer front end designed to clear smoke and steam away from cab. This as not so successful on second loco, so additional smoke deflectors were fitted to this loco.
The final 4 locos had A4 type wedge front ends, and the first 2 were subsequently rebuilt with wedge front ends.
Non corridor (A3 style) tenders were used. 
Thompson rebuilt all these locos to 4-6-2 locos(A2), and they ran until 19659/60. 
2 new locos are in the process of being built now. One in original style, one with A4 wedged front end. 
 

2001 Cock O' The North

Original Condition

Requires finishing off, wheels etc


2002 Earl Marischal
Original Condition

Requires finishing off, wheels etc


2002 Earl Marischal
rebuilt with additional smoke deflectors

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

Non Corridor tender for

2001 Cock O' The North

2002 Earl Marischal

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

2001 Cock O' The North(final)
2002 Earl Marischal(final)
2003 Lord President
2004 Mons Meg
2005 Thane of Fife
2006 Wolf of Badenoch

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

LNER W1 4-6-4 loco

Original pioneering high pressure boiler version of loco.

After 5 years development trials started in 1929.

Single chimney replaced by double chimney, and then a cowl was fitted to improve smoke dispersal, shortly before entering works again in 1935 for full rebuild.

Eventually scrapped 1959

 

 

Chassis and wheels required.

 

 

 

Original single chimney version

 

1931 modified version
double chimney version
final double chimney with cowl fitted
original corridor tender(ex A3)
  LNER W1 4-6-4 loco

with valances


Classic streamlined loco rebuilt from original pioneering Hush Hush loco, with A4 type streamlining and boiler
Eventually scrapped 1959


Chassis and wheels required. 
LNER W1 4-6-4 loco

without valances



Classic streamlined loco rebuilt from original pioneering Hush Hush loco, with A4 type streamlining and boiler
Eventually scrapped 1959


Chassis and wheels required. 
LNER W1 4-6-4 loco Tender

Early fully streamlined



Tender for classic streamlined loco rebuilt from original pioneering Hush Hush loco, with A4 type streamlining and boiler
Eventually scrapped 1959

Tender survived 

Chassis and wheels required. 

  GWR Collett 2251 goods loco 


Introduced in 1930 as a replacement for the earlier Dean Goods 0-6-0s and built up to 1948.
They could be found operating on most parts of the former GWR system. 
One loco ,3205, is preserved.



Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  GWR Collett 3500 tender

standard tender introduced in 1920/30s. Used with various locos including Collett goods(2251)
  LSWR Beattie well tank loco

round splasher version




originally built between 1863 and 1875 for use on passenger services in the suburbs of London, 3 ended up on the Bodmin and Wadebridge Railway, and were finally withdrawn in 1962 and two have been preserved in an operational condition. 



Requires finishing off, wheels etc
LSWR Beattie well tank loco



rectangular splasher version


originally built between 1863 and 1875 for use on passenger services in the suburbs of London, 3 ended up on the Bodmin and Wadebridge Railway, and were finally withdrawn in 1962 and two have been preserved in an operational condition. 



Requires finishing off, wheels etc
 

LSWR KESR Saddleback 0330 loco

 Originally supplied to LSWR from Beyer Peacock in 1876, as shunting locos. 20 were eventually built, and all survived in SR days, after which most were either withdrawn or had some rebuilding. One was sold to KESR , 2 ended up on the East Kent Railway. The KESR one lasted till 1948, having been steamed for last time in 1946.

The design was also supplied to one Irish railway, and some other foreign railways.

 None are preserved.

 Based on drawing for KESR loco.

 Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

GER/LNER J69 (S56) loco

20 introduced in 1904, based on earlier R24 loco,with larger water tanks and cab, and having a boiler with higher boiler pressure.
modified by LM}NER with higher cabs and new chimney.
Five of these transferred to War Department in 1940.
Other locos after losing passenger duties used as pilots at various stations in particular Liverpool Street. Last 3 locos withdrawn 1962.
One loco is now preserved in original condition.

 Requires finishing off, wheels etc

GER/LNER J69 (S56) loco
Modified final version

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

Garstang and Knott End Railway 

The Garstang and Knot-End Railway ran between Garstang and Pilling, in the Fylde of Lancashire. In 1898 the Knott End Railway was authorised to continue to Knott End; it opened in 1908.

Salt extraction near Preesall became a dominant industry from 1890. The passenger service was discontinued in 1930 and the line closed completely in 1965. 

Coaches HERE

Goods stock HERE

 

 

0-4-2ST HEBE loco



HEBE was the first loco on the railway, being supplied by Black,Hawthorn and Co of Gateshead-on Tyne in 1870, works number 118. It was sold on in 1872.

Based on drawing for loco,which had been done from known dimensions . 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  0-6-0ST HOPE loco

.

HOPE was supplied by Hudswell Clarke in 1883, in part exchange for UNION. It worked on line till 1900 and then was part exchanged for NEW CENTURY. 

Based on drawing for loco, which had been done from known dimensions and other info from makers . 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  0-6-0ST FARMERS FRIEND loco

FARMERS FRIEND was supplied by supplied by Hudswell Clarke in 1875, and returned to makers in part exchange in 1900.



Based on drawing for loco, which had been done from known dimensions and other info from makers . 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
 
0-4-0ST UNION loco


UNION was originally built in 1868 by Manning Wardle and arrived on the line n 1875, eventually leaving the line in 1883 after being sold to Hudswell Clarke part exchange for HOPE.




Based on drawing for loco,which had been done from known dimensions and other info from makers . 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  0-6-0ST JUBILEE QUEEN loco


JUBILEE QUEEN and NEW CENTURY were both supplied by Hudswell Clarke in 1900. Some differences between the two, in particular the chimney on NEW CENTURY was taller. Both locos survived to be taken over by the LMS but were scrapped in 1925




Based on drawing for loco,which had been done from known dimensions and other info from makers . 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  0-6-0ST NEW CENTURY loco


JUBILEE QUEEN and NEW CENTURY were both supplied by Hudswell Clarke in 1900. Some differences between the two, in particular the chimney on NEW CENTURY was taller. Both locos survived to be taken over by the LMS but were scrapped in 1925




Based on drawing for loco,which had been done from known dimensions and other info from makers . 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  0-6-0T KNOTT END loco


KNOTT END was purchased from Manning Wardle for the opening of the line to Knott End in 1908.It survived into LMS ownership and was scrapped in 1924.



Based on drawing for loco,which had been done from known dimensions and other info from makers . 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  2-6-0T BLACKPOOL loco


BLACKPOOL was purchased from Manning Wardle in 1909, intended for freight but also used on passenger trains. It was the biggest and most powerful loco on the line, and was probably the only 2-6-0T loco operating in Britain. It continued in operation until 1927.



Based on drawing for loco,which had been done from known dimensions and other info from makers . 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
2-6-0T BLACKPOOL loco (final condition)

As modified in 1920s

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

Selsey Tramway/West Sussex Railway
   0-4-2ST Chichester no 1 loco

early condition


Original bought for building of the SelseyTramway, but instead of selling it once the line was built, it stayed on and was the first loco to pull a passenger train, as no other loco was available. 
It had been originally an 0-6-0ST, but by removing rods to rear wheels became an o-4-2ST,and then to improve running, had a radial axle with 2ft diameter wheels fitted.
Some small changes were made over the years and was scrapped in 1913.



Requires finishing off, wheels etc
0-4-2ST Chichester no 1 loco

final condition


Original bought for building of the SelseyTramway, but instead of selling it once the line was built, it stayed on and was the first loco to pull a passenger train, as no other loco was available. 
It had been originally an 0-6-0ST, but by removing rods to rear wheels became an o-4-2ST,and then to improve running, had a radial axle with 2ft diameter wheels fitted.
Some small changes were made over the years and was scrapped in 1913.



Requires finishing off, wheels etc
 

2-4-2T Selsey loco 

Early condition

 

Bought new for opening of the line, but did not quite arrive in time for first train. Built by Peckett and Sons, Bristol, to Colonel Stephen's specification, using mainly standard parts. Thought to be intended as prototype for a new class, but remained only one built.

Over the years it was rebuilt and modified, the most obvious change being moving of water tanks backwards into the cab, to redistribute weight better.

Withdrawn from service finally in 1934, and scrapped in 1936.

 

 Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

 

2-4-2T Selsey loco 

Final condition

 

Bought new for opening of the line, but did not quite arrive in time for first train. Built by Peckett and Sons, Bristol, to Colonel Stephen's specification, using mainly standard parts. Thought to be intended as prototype for a new class, but remained only one built.

Over the years it was rebuilt and modified, the most obvious change being moving of water tanks backwards into the cab, to redistribute weight better.

Withdrawn from service finally in 1934, and scrapped in 1936.

 

 Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

  

0-6-0ST Manning Wardle loco Sidlesham

 Early condition

 

 

Built originally in 1862 by Manning Wardle as a class I loco, it arrived in Selsey in 1907. It lasted till 1930s, with various small modifications over the years the most significant being replacement ab back sheet, buffers and smokebox door. Other fittings came, and went then came back again. 

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

 

0-6-0ST Manning Wardle loco Sidlesham

 Final condition

 

 

Built originally in 1862 by Manning Wardle as a class I loco, it arrived in Selsey in 1907. It lasted till 1930s, with various small modifications over the years the most significant being replacement ab back sheet, buffers and smokebox door. Other fittings came, and went then came back again. 

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

 

0-4-2st Hesperus

 

Early condition

 

Built originally as an 0-4-0ST by Neilson and Co of Glasgow in 1871 for the 3ft 6in gauge West Cornwall Railway, and when the PDSWJR took over and converted the line to standard gauge.

it was converted to standard gauge as an 0-4-2ST, with a cab added.

In 1911 it was sold to the Selsey Tramway, and ran in this condition until 1916, when it was rebuilt with a new firebox. This resulted in boiler being raised, and at same time cab was extended backwards with a new back plate, changing its appearance dramatically.

In this condition it continued to run up till 1924 and was moved to a siding and quietly rotted away. The backplate of the cab found its way onto the loco Sidlesham.

 

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

0-4-2st Hesperus

 

Final condition

 

Built originally as an 0-4-0ST by Neilson and Co of Glasgow in 1871 for the 3ft 6in gauge West Cornwall Railway, and when the PDSWJR took over and converted the line to standard gauge.

it was converted to standard gauge as an 0-4-2ST, with a cab added.

In 1911 it was sold to the Selsey Tramway, and ran in this condition until 1916, when it was rebuilt with a new firebox. This resulted in boiler being raised, and at same time cab was extended backwards with a new back plate, changing its appearance dramatically.

In this condition it continued to run up till 1924 and was moved to a siding and quietly rotted away. The backplate of the cab found its way onto the loco Sidlesham.

 

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

 

0-6-0ST Hudswell Clarke loco Chichester no 2

 Original Condition

 

Built by Hudswell Clarke in 1902. It arrived at Selsey in 1920, with just up-and-over front weatherboard, and a simple wooden box cab was built locally. This cab lasted till fateful accident in 1923, and cab rebuilt using original cab front and rear from original Sidlesham loco. finally scrapped in 1932.

 

 

 

 

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

0-6-0ST Hudswell Clarke loco Chichester no 2

 Early Condition

 

Built by Hudswell Clarke in 1902. It arrived at Selsey in 1920, with just up-and-over front weatherboard, and a simple wooden box cab was built locally. This cab lasted till fateful accident in 1923, and cab rebuilt using original cab front and rear from original Sidlesham loco. finally scrapped in 1932.

 

 

 

 

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

0-6-0ST Hudswell Clarke loco Chichester no 2

 Final Condition

 

Built by Hudswell Clarke in 1902. It arrived at Selsey in 1920, with just up-and-over front weatherboard, and a simple wooden box cab was built locally. This cab lasted till fateful accident in 1923, and cab rebuilt using original cab front and rear from original Sidlesham loco. finally scrapped in 1932.

 

 

 

 

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

 

0-6-0ST Manning Wardle loco Ringing Rock

 Ringing Rock was last but one loco to enter service on the Selsey Tramway, in 1922. A slightly larger Manning Wardle loco than the other two, being a class K . Remained mainly unmodified whilst on the line, apart from cab backplate being moved forward when it first arrived. Last steaming in January 1935, and then scrapped.

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 
 

0-6-0ST Manning Wardle loco Morous

 

Morous was the last loco entering service on the Selsey Tramway, in 1924, having worked on the Shopshire and Montgomery since 1910.

Worked all steam hauled trains in final 6 months of the line, including the demotion train in 1936 and was then scrapped.

Same class of Manning Wardle as Sidlesham, but dfferent in a number of ways.

 

 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

 

  Manning Wardle L class loco Sir Berkeley

Built in 1890, moved around various industrial users. Eventually bought for preservation in 1960s and restored for use on KWVR and other railways. 

Requires chassis,wheels etc
  SECR H class 0-4-4T loco

The South Eastern and Chatham Railway H Class originally designed for suburban passenger work, designed by Harry Wainwright in 1904. Most of the sixty-six members of the class were later equipped for push-pull working for use on rural branch lines.
Lasrt loco withdrawn in 1964 and has been preserved in working order.


Requires wheels,chassis etc

LSWR 0415 loco

Original boiler type

 

Originally designed by Marsh for LSWR suburban services in 1882. Built by 4 different companies.

Soon replaced by other locos and many withdrawn by end of WW1. One loco 488 sold to Ministry of Munitions, then sold onto Colonel Stephens for use on East Kent Railway. Little used and after WW2 came to attention of the Southern Railway who still had 2 locos and required another.  3 locos taken over by British Railways.  Locos appear to have been fitted with both original and Drummond boilers, but had Drummond chimneys.

When withdrawn in 1961, former loco no 488 had original boiler and was rescued by Bluebell railway and has been well used on that line.

 

Requires chassis,wheels etc

 

LSWR 0415 loco

Dummond boiler type

 

Originally designed by Marsh for LSWR suburban services in 1882. Built by 4 different companies.

Soon replaced by other locos and many withdrawn by end of WW1. One loco 488 sold to Ministry of Munitions, then sold onto Colonel Stephens for use on East Kent Railway. Little used and after WW2 came to attention of the Southern Railway who still had 2 locos and required another.  3 locos taken over by British Railways.  Locos appear to have been fitted with both original and Drummond boilers, but had Drummond chimneys.

When withdrawn in 1961, former loco no 488 had original boiler and was rescued by Bluebell railway and has been well used on that line.

 

Requires chassis,wheels etc

 

  NBR/LNER J83 (D class) loco

original version


40 of these were introduced in 1901, for branch, freight and shunting work. Most were used for shunting.
Rebuilt by LNER with new boilers which externally looked the same except for new lower domes fitted.
All but one taken over by British Railways and gradually replaced by diesel shunters, final ones being withdrawn in 1962. 

Requires chassis and finishing

NBR/LNER J83 (D class) loco

modified verion(final)


40 of these were introduced in 1901, for branch, freight and shunting work. Most were used for shunting.
Rebuilt by LNER with new boilers which externally looked the same except for new lower domes fitted.
All but one taken over by British Railways and gradually replaced by diesel shunters, final ones being withdrawn in 1962. 

Requires chassis and finishing

NBR/LNER N15 (A class) loco

Based on the J83 loco, lengthened with larger boiler. Introduced 1909. Building continued into LNER days. Last one withdrawn 1962. 

Requires chassis and finishing
NBR/LNER C15 (M class) loco

Introduced from 1911. Primarily used on commuter and coastal passenger trains. Last 2(pushpull fitted) withdrawn in 1960. 

Requires chassis and finishing
NBR/LNER J37 (S class) loco



Introduced from 1914. Primarily used on heavy freight. Successful design, last examples lasting till 1967.

Requires chassis and finishing
NBR/LNER J37 (S class) loco

tender


Introduced from 1914. Primarily used on heavy freight. Successful design, last examples lasting till 1967.

Requires chassis and finishing
Diesel/Petrol locomotives    

Ford Dagenham diesel electric shunter

Body for the diesel electric shunter used at Ford Dagenham from the 30s up to the 60s, and now preserved at KESR. 
Information colected from various sources, but specially David Smith who supplied dimensions, he had collected to build model for Luton MRC, and featured in BRM. Also to members of RMweb who supplied information, including original drawings and photos. 

 
 

 

 

Standard Gauge Simplex shunting loco

At the end of WW1 Simplex experimented with a slightly modified armoured Simplex loco on a tandard gauge chassis. After WW1 they simplified th body, creating a very open cabbed loco. It found use on both industrial and mainline railway systems. Alternative enclosed cabs offering more room were later either provided as standard, or were added by companies themselves. Many suurvived in to BR days, and examples of various types are preserved. 

This is based on the original open type. There were many minor differences in locos,such as seats and fuel tank, so this is more more generalised version. 

Requires finishing off, wheels and mechanism etc. 

 
GWR standard gauge Simplex loco 15

At the end of WW1 Simplex experimented with a slightly modified armoured Simplex loco on a standard gauge chassis. After WW1 they simplified the body, creating a very open cabbed loco. It found use on both industrial and mainline railway systems. Alternative enclosed cabs offering more room were later either provided as standard, or were added by companies themselves. Many survived in to BR days, and examples of various types are preserved.

The GWR bought a Simplex loco with improved cab but open sides, in 1923 (numbered 15) followed by 4 shunters, with what some describe a garden shed appearance, numbered 23,24,26 and 27. All survived into BR, no 15 being scrapped in 1951, the others in 1960.

There were also many minor differences in locos, such as seats and fuel tank, so this is more more generalized version.

No 15 was rarely photographed, only one photo being found, but similar official Motor Rail catalogue photos show virtually identical locos on sale at same time. 
Model design has been adapted from other Simplex designs using photos. 

Requires finishing off, wheels and mechansm etc.
GWR Standard Gauge Simplex shunting loco nos 23,24,26 and 27

The GWR bought a Simplex loco with improved cab but open sides, in 1923 (numbered 15) followed by 4 shunters,with what some describe a garden shed appearance, numbered 23,24,26 and 27. All survived into BR, no 15 being scrapped in 1951, the others in 1960.

Requires finishing off, wheels and mechanism etc. 

LNER standard gauge Simplex loco 
(ex GER)

The LNER acquired 3 Simplex locos, one from GER, one from NBR and one from Preston Water Works.

The GER one was originally supplied in 1919. In all photos it has a wooden cab, presumably locally built. It remained in this condition till being scrapped.


Both NBR and GER locos scrapped in 1956.

LNER standard gauge Simplex loco 
(ex NBR)

The LNER acquired 3 Simplex locos, one from GER, one from NBR and one from Preston Water Works.

The NBR received their loco in 1921. At some time in LNER ownership the cab was replaced with version in this model.I moved south in LNER days.

Both NBR and GER locos scrapped in 1956.

Standard Gauge Simplex Loco
(final one built)

In 1949 the final standard gaue loco originally derived from the WW1 narrow gauge Tin Turtle was supplied to a company in Rochdale and is now preserved at East Lancs Railway. 

interior for standard gauge simplex
Hibberd Simplex(Planet) standard gauge loco 

At end of WW1 ex service locos were sold off, but many had not even left Britain. One company Kent Construction and Engineering bought up some and either refurbished them or used them as basis of a standard gauge shunting loco. When this company closed it became FC Hibberd and Co.

 As this loco was based on the original Tin Turtle as well, it has many dimensional similarities to the standard gauge Simplex, so this has been used as a basis combined with photos. Several of these locos are preserved, but as is typical of industrial locos there are small variations and alterations. 

Requires finishing off, wheels and mechansm etc.

 

Standard Gauge 50hp 8ton Simplex shunting loco

This was a standard gauge version of the type 60S narrow gauge Simplex loco. It proved surprisingly good at shunting standard gauge. 


Requires chassis and finishing

 
North Sunderland Railway Armstrong Whitworth diesel

Built in 1933 by Armstrong Whitworth after successfully testing pre-production prototype diesel electic loco on the North Sunderland line. Carried name 'The Lady Armstrong'.
One of 5, it ran until 1946, and put to one side as no spares available. Finally scrapped in 1949.
2 of the sister locos have been preserved, one at Beamish, and and one at Tanfield Railway(re-engined)

Requires chassis,wheels etc
 
  Gaston Moyse 8Tn loco

Gaston Moyse produced small petrol and diesel locos in Paris from 1922 up till 1970s, for both industry and main line railways. At least one of their locos operated in Britain(Atlas Stone Company,Meldreth) during 1930s.

This was one of their small locos, based on drawings in French magazine. One example still exists , plinthed outside Gare de Saint-Rambert d'Albon.

Requires wheels,chassis 
Baldwin 50hp gas mechanical loco

Supplied to the French and American military in WW1. After the war many were used by industrial and light railways. Some were also converted into standard gauge locos. Many narrow gauge and at least one standard gauge loco are preserved in working order. 

Requires wheels,chassis 

  Crochat Type 22 loco

 

1908 - 1918 Construction of 420 petrol-electric locomotives Crochat system:
- 130 of 22 t for standard gauge


Many found there way into industrial use after WW1. 


Requires finishing, chassis and wheels.

  Crochat Type 44 loco

 

1908 - 1918 Construction of 420 petrol-electric locomotives Crochat system:
- 90 of 44 t for standard gauge



Many found there way into industrial use after WW1. 

This version is believed to be originally-military version used to tow large military guns during WW1.

Requires finishing, chassis and wheels

 

Crochat Type 44 loco

 

1908 - 1918 Construction of 420 petrol-electric locomotives Crochat system:
- 90 of 44 t for standard gauge



Many found there way into industrial use after WW1. 

Thought to be a non military version as only phots show this version in industrial use. Preserved loco is this version.

Requires finishing, chassis and wheels

 

BR(GWR) Gas Turbine loco 18000

18000 was a prototype mainline gas turbine-electric locomotive built for British Railways in 1949 by Brown, Boveri & Cie. It had, however, been ordered by the Great Western Railway in 1946,but construction was delayed. It spent its working life on the Western Region of British Railways, operating express passenger services from Paddington station, London. 

At the end of 1960 18000 was withdrawn from operation and was stored at Swindon Works for four years. It then returned to mainland Europe, where for more than ten years it was used, in substantially altered (and no longer gas-turbine-powered) form, for experiments concerning the interaction between steel wheels and steel rails, under the auspices of the International Union of Railways. 
In the early 1990s it was secured for preservation. It returned to the UK and initially kept at The Railway Age, Crewe. then moved to Didcot Railway Centre. 

Requires chassis,wheels etc
  Gas Turbine loco 181000

British Railways 18100 was a prototype main line gas turbine-electric locomotive built for British Railways in 1951 by Metropolitan-Vickers, Manchester. It had, however, been ordered by the Great Western Railway in the 1940s, but construction was delayed due to World War II. It spent its working life on the Western Region of British Railways, operating express passenger services from Paddington station, London. 

In early 1958 it was withdrawn from operation and was stored at Swindon Works for a short period before it was returned to Metropolitan Vickers for conversion as a prototype 25 kV AC electric locomotive. As an electric locomotive, it was numbered E1000 (E2001 from 1959) and was given the TOPS classification of class 80.


Requires chassis,wheels etc
  GT3 loco
The Chocolate Zephyr


GT3, meaning Gas Turbine number 3 (following 18000 and 18100 as gas turbines 1 and 2), was a prototype mainline gas turbine locomotive built in 1961 by English Electric at their Vulcan Foundry in Newton-le-Willows to investigate the use of its gas turbines in rail traction applications.
Upon completion of the Shap test runs GT3 was returned to English Electric at Vulcan Foundry at the end of 1962 and stored.
It was partially disantled and finally scrapped in 1966.

Requires chassis,wheels etc
   BR class 23 diesel loco (Baby Deltic)

original condition

class of ten Bo-Bo diesel-electric locomotives built by the English Electric Company (EE) in 1959.
After numerous problems and attempts to fix them, it was decided by BR and EE to refurbish the class and modify the engines with new parts designed by the engine manufacturer. The locos also had modifications to their nose ends, losing the gangway doors and headcode discs in favour of a central roller blind headcode box. 
The modifications were successful, but only lasted till 1971. 

None have been preserved. 


Requires finishing off, wheels etc
BR class 23 diesel loco (Baby Deltic)

Final modified condition

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

  bogie sides for class 23 loco
  BR class 37 diesel loco 
First Batch

possibly one of the most successful mainline diesel locos introduced by BR in 1950s, being used all over BR network.
Two initial batches produced, with small differences.
Modified in 1980s, some even found use on TGV construction trains south of France. 
Some are still in operation in Britain. 
Requires finishing off, wheels etc
BR class 37 diesel loco 
Second Batch

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

BR class 37 diesel loco 
Modified version

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

BR class 37 diesel loco 

bogie sides (one bogie)

  BR class 41 diesel loco (Warship)



British Railways Class 41 diesel-hydraulic locomotives were built by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow during 1957 and 1958 .
They worked on the London-Plymouth-Penzance route of the Western Region.
All five locomotives were withdrawn on 30 December 1967.

None have been preserved. 


Requires finishing off, wheels etc
BR class 41 diesel loco (Warship)

modified final condition




Requires finishing off, wheels etc
BR class 41 diesel loco (Warship)

bogie sides


     
Electric Locomotives    
Midland Railway Battery Loco.

The North Staffordshire Railway (NSR) built a battery loco for T. Bolton & Sons in 1917. This lasted till 1963, and is now preserved at NRM. The other was built by Midland Railway in Derby in 1913 for shunting at Poplar docks.


Requires chassis, and finishing
 
North Staffordshire Railway Battery Loco.

The North Staffordshire Railway (NSR) built a battery loco for T. Bolton & Sons in 1917. This lasted till 1963, and is now preserved at NRM. The other was built by Midland Railway in Derby in 1913 for shunting at Poplar docks.


Requires chassis, and finishing
 
   Class 80 loco


Class 80 was the TOPS classification allocated by British Rail to the prototype 25 kV AC electric locomotive. This locomotive was built by Metropolitan-Vickers, initially as a prototype gas turbine-electric locomotive, numbered 18100. British Rail allocated the number E1000 (and later E2001) to the locomotive following its conversion from gas turbine propulsion.

The locomotive was used to prepare the ground for the 25 kV AC electrification being installed on the West Coast Main Line, including the testing of overhead line equipment and staff training. 
Once the production locomotives (Class 81 onwards) were in service, E2001 was no longer required. It was put into store at the end of 1961, and lasted for over ten years at various locations. It was officially withdrawn in April 1968 and scrapped in November 1972 at J Cashmore in Great Bridge. 

Requires chassis,wheels etc
NER 2-CO-2 electric loco EE1


In the 1910s the North Eastern Railway made plans to electrify its York-Newcastle main line and this locomotive was built for hauling passenger trains. 

After grouping in 1923 the London and North Eastern Railway dropped the electrification project so the locomotive was never used. It survived into British Railways ownership but was withdrawn in August 1950.

In 1945, no. 13 was classified EE1 (Electric Express 1) and renumbered to 6999; and under British Railways, it became no. 26600 in 1948. 

Includes bogies 

Requires chassis,wheels etc
 

North Eastern Railway  ES1 BO-BO electric loco 

The Newcastle Quayside branch was about a mile long and connected the Newcastle Quayside to Trafalgar Yard near Manors East Station. As it had a number of tunnels, making steam operation very difficult, it was decided to electrify the branch when  the Tyneside suburban lines had been electrified.

Two Bo-Bo electric locomotives (Nos. 1 & 2) were built to operate the branch in 1905. They operated from overhead wires in the open, but from a 3rd rail in the tunnels as there was limited headroom.

They continued in operation until diesels took over in the late 1950s, and fortunately one loco was saved for preservation, and is now part of the national collection.

 

Requires chassis, wheels etc

 

 


 

North Eastern Railway EF1/EB1 BO-BO electric locos
The Class EF1 electric locos were built by the North Eastern Railway from 1914. They were built to haul coal trains from the mines at Shildon to the docks at Middlesbrough.
Electric traction on the Shildon line was discontinued in 1935 but the locomotives were retained for possible future use. Number 11 (later BR 26510) was rebuilt in 1941 for use as a banker on the Manchester-Sheffield line, and given the classification EB1.
The EF1s were withdrawn in 1950–51. In 1949 the EB1,was moved to Ilford Depot (Eastern Region) for use as a shunter.and transferred to departmental stock (as no. 100) in 1959 and withdrawn in 1964. None of the locomotives are preserved.

  North Eastern Railway EF1 BO-BO electric loco




Requires chassis, wheels etc
North Eastern Railway EB1 BO-BO electric loco


Rebuilt from an EF1 loco

Requires chassis, wheels etc
  Metropolitan Railway Camel-back electric loco (nos 1-10)


The Metropolitan Railway ordered electric locomotives from British Westinghouse and made by Metropolitan Amalgamated. The first ten were built with Westinghouse electrical control equipment and entered service in 1906. These 'camel-back' bogie locomotives featured a central cab.
Forward visibility was not good,so next loco type had flat fronts. Also the state of the art electrical equipment was not as reliable and some changes were made, but ultimately new locos were introduced. 
One was converted into a new style which ultimately ended up with new build MetroVickers locos which were very successful . 



Requires finishing off, wheels etc

  Metropolitan Railway boxcab electric loco (nos 11-20)

The second ten, also constructed by Metropolitan Amalgamated, were built to a box car design with British Thompson Houston control equipment
Forward visibility on the camel-backs was not good, so this loco type had flat fronts. There were still some problems so when the next loco was designed (initially modifying one of each previous types) it had a V shaped front end to reduce wind noise.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
  Metropolitan Railway Metro-Vick electric locos

In the early 1920s, the Metropolitan placed an order with Metropolitan-Vickers for rebuilding the twenty electric locomotives. When work started on the first locomotive, it was found to be impractical and uneconomical and the order was changed to building completely new locomotives using some equipment recovered from the originals. The new locomotives were built in 1922-1923.
They proved very successful, and continued in service up till complete electrification of the Amersham line in 1960s.
2 locos are preserved, one of which is in full working order. 

Requires finishing off, wheels etc
    District Railway Electric Loco

The District Railway bought ten bogie box cab locomotives in 1905. They were manufactured by the Metropolitan Amalgamated Carriage and Wagon Company, and most of them had driving controls at one end. Consequently, they were worked in pairs, coupled back to back with the cabs at the outer end.
The locomotives were used to haul London and North Western Railway passenger trains on the electrified section of the Outer Circle route between Earl's Court and Mansion House. After that servce was terminated in 1908,they were used to haul District line trains, one coupled to each end of a rake of four trailer cars. From 1910 trains from the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway (LT&SR) were extended over the District line, the steam locomotives being exchanged for electric ones at Barking. Two rakes of carriages were provided by the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway, and were hauled over the District tracks by the locomotives working in pairs. 

Three of the locomotives were withdrawn , the remaining 7 continued in service up till 1938, and the final one in 1939 when the service closed at start of WW2.

Some of the LTSR(Ealing) coaches were bought by the government to run troop trains on the Shropshire and Montgomery Railway and continued in use up till 1960s.

Requires finishing off, wheels etc

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locomotives rolling stock
 

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